Transit Equity Back in the Crosshairs

With budget cuts at TriMet and new fare policy under consideration at Portland Streetcar, equity issues are front and center. So here are two attempts by agencies to get at these issues:

  1. TriMet will hold a budget forum in conjunction with IRCO (Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization) specifically to reach out to transit-dependent folks:

    What: TriMet & IRCO Community Budget Forum
    When: Thursday, February 9, 2012 (reception starts @ 5:30pm, forum begins @ 6:00pm)
    Where: IRCO, 10201 10301 NE Glisan Street, Portland, Oregon

  2. The City of Portland has released their required Title VI analysis for Streetcar fare issues (PDF, 651K).
10 Comments

10 Responses to Transit Equity Back in the Crosshairs

  1. al m
    February 6, 2012 at 11:39 pm Link

    “When I hear ‘equity’ , I am reminded of a blind man in a dark room – looking for a black hat – which isn’t there”

    (Charles Bowen)

  2. Jason Barbour
    February 7, 2012 at 8:30 am Link

    OK, I realize IRCO is one of the venues large enough to hold something like this, but it’s actually quite a walk from 102nd and Glisan. To make matters more fun, yes there’s transit at the front door, but it’s the 25-Gilsan that runs less than hourly and will likely wrap-up its service day before the meeting will be over. (I wonder if its on the “cut” list.)
    One could try to take the 15-Belmont; if it’s running on time and they’re not coming from north of Gateway TC (remember the rest of the 102nd Ave. portion up to Parkrose TC was eliminated several years ago).

  3. Chris I
    February 7, 2012 at 9:20 am Link

    Have you thought about riding a bike? That location is very close to the I-205 path and Burnside, which are both great for cycling.

    Or you can walk the 1/2 mile from Gateway TC (10mins).

  4. Jason McHuff
    February 7, 2012 at 11:27 am Link

    Transit equity also came up at the mayoral debate last night

  5. Jason McHuff
    February 7, 2012 at 11:51 am Link

    I think they have the address wrong. IRCO appears to be at 10301 NE Glisan St. But in any case, I’m not seeing how it’s a long walk from 102nd and Glisan. Even from either of the MAX stations in the area it doesn’t seem to too far to walk.

  6. Jason Barbour
    February 7, 2012 at 12:40 pm Link

    Have you thought about riding a bike?
    I think they have the address wrong.

    Yes, and all this proves my point that at the time the meeting is being held, the location is not directly accessible by public transportation revenue service!

    Sounds like they might be trying to stack the deck and claim that meeting attendees took modes other than TriMet service, so there’s really nothing to see here and the budget cuts affect “nobody,” and “nobody” lives, works, owns property, or goes anywhere that isn’t served by rail.

    However, “nobody” pours your coffee, “nobody” serves your food, “nobody” answers the 24-hour customer service hotline, “nobody” cleans your place of employment or for that matter any other business after hours, “nobody” should ever question any decision made because “we have to do this!”

    Yep, this is the TRIMET THEME SONG! (Or at least a good candidate for it.)

    There is something I like about Spokane: the transit system works. Say the bus system should be dismantled because the city “has” to have light rail; you’re through.

  7. Jason McHuff
    February 7, 2012 at 2:02 pm Link

    the location is not directly accessible by public transportation revenue service!

    Transit isn’t supposed to necessarily directly serve every address. Given that there’s decent service 1-2 blocks away on 102nd and that there’s more routes and even a MAX station within 1/3 mile, it seems pretty good.

    Plus, I’ve heard that they have to find these locations on short notice, and it seems they’re trying to target people who already use this place.

  8. Chris I
    February 7, 2012 at 2:27 pm Link

    If you can’t walk 1/2 a mile from Gateway to get to this meeting, you may need a LIFT pass…

  9. EngineerScotty
    February 7, 2012 at 2:38 pm Link

    Another article on the proposed fare increase, from a carless mom with children.

    And an interesting question: Are the Honored Citizen fares good policy? My understanding is that the Federal Government essentially requires a senior discount on federally-funded transit systems, but how much is appropriate? If the discount is meant to help out a population that is more likely to be on a fixed income, and/or have mobility issues, might it be better to address these issues directly through fare policies benefiting the poor, in particular. (And it seems that the correct response to the mobility-impaired ought to be services designed to assist them, such as LIFT or routes with frequent stops, not by fare discounts).

  10. al m
    February 7, 2012 at 10:52 pm Link

    Plus, I’ve heard that they have to find these locations on short notice, and it seems they’re trying to target people who already use this place.

    [Moderator: Personally-directed remark removed — ES]

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