Field Notes on Tolling Technology

While traveling on the East Coast last week, I had a chance to see tolling technology from an up-close and personal perspective. Unfortunately, as I was in a rental car, I got to see the advantages of the technology from the slow lane.

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While traveling on the East Coast last week, I had a chance to see tolling technology from an up-close and personal perspective. Unfortunately, as I was in a rental car, I got to see the advantages of the technology from the slow lane.

New Hampshire uses the E-ZPass system (accepted in 11 states), while Massachusetts employs the Fast Lane system (proprietary to the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority, possibly just a private-labeled implementation of one of the commercial systems?). An important point is that these systems tend to inter-operate with each other, so you only need to invest in one transponder.

The big benefit to the consumer of course (the one I couldn’t enjoy) is to just drive through the gates, without having to pick up tickets or pay tolls.

How does payment work? You provide a credit card number, and they take $25 to fund your ‘account’. When the balance in your account gets low, they hit your credit card again to top it off at $25.

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