Urban Renewal For Transportation Advocates

I’ve raved here before about the PSU/PDOT Traffic and Transportation Class. It’s a great way for citizens to learn how the transportation system and bureaucracy work.

Last year, I had the chance to take the inaugural version of a similar class that explains the inner workings of urban renewal. And it’s about to run again.

I’ve raved here before about the PSU/PDOT Traffic and Transportation Class. It’s a great way for citizens to learn how the transportation system and bureaucracy work.

Last year, I had the chance to take the inaugural version of a similar class that explains the inner workings of urban renewal. And it’s about to run again.

So why am I writing about this on this blog? Because of late, urban renewal has become a regular component of funding big transportation projects (think Interstate MAX and the Streetcar). So I would encourage all transportation advocates to consider learning about how it works.

And the facilitator, Carl Talton, knows almost as much about Urban Renewal as Rick Gustafson does about Transportation.

Details follow…

Urban Renewal and Redevelopment Class
Spring Term 2006

What: A 10-week course sponsored by the Portland Development Commission and PSU’s Urban Studies Program
When: April 4 to June 13
Tuesdays, 6:40-9:00 PM
Where: PSU Campus
Classroom to be determined
Who: This course is designed for the community activist, new or experienced, who wants to learn about and be involved in urban renewal activities in their community.

How is urban renewal performed in Portland? How is it continuing to create new community facilities, open spaces and transportation options, as well as stimulate new jobs and housing opportunities in the City? How is it funded? And how can citizens impact urban renewal policies and projects in their neighborhoods and business districts?

Explore the history of urban renewal in Oregon and Portland, and talk to the real policy-makers to discuss the basics of how it works and why it is the preferred tool for revitalizing some areas. They will talk about the costs, benefits and trade-offs of urban renewal, and PDC’s continuing role in investing in the projects and programs that help shape our city.

The class brings together people to ask the tough questions with those who have to make the tough decisions about spending and project priorities and the trade offs involved.

Speakers include elected officials, PDC Commissioners and directors, neighborhood activists, housing advocates, business owners and land and building developers. The class is facilitated by Carl Talton, a former chairman of the Portland Development Commission, the City’s urban renewal agency.

Limited space is available for the ten-week class during the Spring Term. Full scholarships are available to qualified City of Portland residents for the non-credit course. To be eligible for a scholarship, applicants must live in the City of Portland and not be a PDC employee. Deadline for scholarship application is March 17, 2006.

PSU Tuition is $147 for non-credit or one credit and $293 for graduate credit.
To register or get more course information go to www.pdc.us/uraclass, or contact Kim McFarland at (503) 823-3289 or mcfarlandk@pdc.us

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