Author Archive | Chris Smith

The Future is Bright

One of the pleasures of my holiday season each year is serving on the panel reviewing presentations at the PBOT/PSU Transportation Class.

It gives me great hope for the future that we are creating a regular stream of transportation advocates who will keep making our streets better and safer. This year is no exception:

  • Alexis Gabriel (PDF, 1.6M) wants to revitalize streets, especially in East Portland, as places for people, rather than just cars.
  • Blake Goud (PDF, 625K) is looking at the challenging cycling conditions (do you enjoy finding the 12 inches between the storm drain grate and the auto lane) on Interstate Ave.
  • Anjala Ehelebe (PDF, 822K) has an interesting take on art as traffic calming, or at least entertainment while in traffic.
  • Adrianne Schaefer-Borrego (PDF, 786K) is trying to tame 82nd and Division.
  • David Kaplan (PDF, 179K) has looked at every angle on the regulation and economics of electric charging in the right-of-way on residential streets.
  • Nic Boehm (PDF, 1.3M) has a bold vision for turning Division into an exclusive transitway and bikeway.
  • Melissa Langager and Meegan Watts (PDF, 786K) are keeping the vision of “Lombard Re-imagined” alive, and are starting with a pedestrian crossing of a freeway ramp.

Keep advocating!

KBOO Bike Show: Cyclocross

 Listen to the show (mp3, 26.1MB)

This month the Bike Show explores the life cycle of Cyclocross in the United States. From the birth of cyclocross in the 70’s, we speak with Laurence Malone– a.k.a. The Godfather of Cyclocross racing– about the sport’s humble origins in the us and what it was like to be the lone American on the starting line overseas in the early years.

We’re also be joined by current pro Ryan Trebon of the Cannondale Cyclocross World Team and recently retired and 2013 Cyclocross World Masters Champion Sue Butler about how the sport of ‘cross has (or hasn’t) grown in the ensuing years.

The Future of Car Ownership

Via Planetizen:

Accounting/consulting firm KPMG predicts that the share of multi-car households will drop from today’s 57% to 43% by 2040. That will be driven by a combination of demographics and ridesharing (e.g., Uber) and carsharing (e.g. Zipcar) services.

Others suggest that autonomous vehicles could be an additional disrupter.

BRT 101 by Metro

Metro is holding an “introduction to BRT” session next week as part of the Powell/Division Corridor process:

December 1: Catch a sneak preview of the future of transit

Metro invites you to a sneak preview of our region’s transit future. The popcorn’s on us.
Monday, Dec. 1, noon to 1 p.m.
Clinton Street Theater
2522 SE Clinton St., Portland

The Powell-Division Transit and Development Project is studying the region’s first bus rapid transit line, which will bring faster, more reliable transit service to a corridor that really needs it.

Bus rapid transit on Powell-Division will save riders time, make transit more comfortable, and connect places we all care about. It will go from downtown Portland and Gresham, linking businesses, educational institutions and thousands of residences in a diverse and growing area. Service could begin as soon as 2020.

But bus rapid transit doesn’t look the same everywhere. There are multiple choices to consider. How will it fit with existing transportation facilities? What could stations look like? What will the experience be like for riders? How might it serve surrounding neighborhoods and support other ways of getting around?

On Monday, Dec. 1 at the unique Clinton Street Theater, we’ll explore examples of bus rapid transit from around the country to see what it could look like here — in the street, at the stations and on board the vehicles. We’ll also highlight existing transit facilities in theregion that can help illustrate options for the new line.

Project staff from Metro and TriMet will be on hand to answer your questions and hear your ideas about bus rapid transit.

Learn more about this event (http://www.oregonmetro.gov/event/powell-division-brt-101/2014-12-01)

 

A Bold Step Toward Vision Zero

During the public hearings on the Comprehensive Plan, and in the Transportation Expert Group (advising PBOT on the Transportation System Plan) PBOT took some heat on a lackluster safety policy (someone characterized it as “keep doing what we’ve been doing”).

I’m happy to report that PBOT has stepped up. At Tuesday’s Planning and Sustainability Commission meeting they proposed the following policy language to guide the City’s efforts for the next 20 years:

Transportation safety impacts the livability of a city and the comfort and security of those using City streets. Comprehensive efforts to improve transportation safety through engineering, education, enforcement and evaluation will be used to eliminate traffic related fatalities and serious injuries from Portland’s transportation system.

(emphasis mine)

That’s a pretty damn clear articulation of Vision Zero. Well done!