Archive | Roads

PDOT Gets Tagged for Lack of Subcontracting

Yesterday’s O includes an article indicating that PDOT has violated statutes for putting re-paving projects out to bid (possibly making it a net-neutral PR day for PDOT, they also got named best employer by the Women in Transportation Seminar, as noted in the Daily Journal of Commerce).

This peaked my interest, because I’m currently reading the book Governing by Network, which discusses strategies for delvering government services in hybrid public/private/non-profit-sector arrangements. While I’m only part way through the book, the key idea is that you ask yourself the outcomes-based question: how can I assemble a network that delivers [insert public benefit here]? In this case, “what network of partners and services can we put together to keep Portland’s streets up to standards?”

I wonder if asking that question would deliver an answer different than just taking bids on certain classes of repaving projects?

//ref=nosim/”> Link to book at Amazon.com
Link to book at Powell’s
Link to book at Multnomah County Library

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The Other Tollbooth Drops

In Sunday’s Oregonian, Jim Mayer reports that a study of the tolling options for building the Newberg Dundee bypass concludes that the most efficient revenue model would require tolling BOTH the new bypass and the existing route on 99W.

In Sunday’s Oregonian, Jim Mayer reports that a study of the tolling options for building the Newberg Dundee bypass concludes that the most efficient revenue model would require tolling BOTH the new bypass and the existing route on 99W.

The study (PDF, 711K), prepared by the Oregon Transportation Investment Group (the local arm of Australian-based Macquarie Infrastructure Group) raises a number of interesting policy and funding issues:

  • Toll pricing ranging from $0.18 to $0.30 per mile, or $1.98 to $3.30 for a trip through the corridor
  • Potential discounts for local users
  • Creation of an electronic tolling system that would become the standard for use on future toll roads in Oregon
  • Possibly extending the project in a number of directions, including subsuming the proposed I-5/99W connector

The price tag for the bypass is estimated (no serious engineering has been done) at $325 to $425 million, while the I-5 connector would be over half a Billion.

Next step, more detailed study of project costs…

I-5 to 99W Connector Project Steering Committee studies ways to improve traffic movement in the area

Excerpted from Rex’s April newsletter:

Regional and local transportation officials have recognized the need for a connection between I-5 and Hwy. 99W for more than a decade. Traffic demand in the southwestern portion of the region has grown substantially, leading to increasingly congested conditions.

Metro Councilor Carl Hosticka serves on the I 5 to 99W Connector Project Steering Committee with other elected officials from Washington and Clackamas counties and the cities of Wilsonville, Tualatin and Sherwood, as well as officials from the Oregon Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration. The committee is currently working to identify a corridor where transportation improvements could be located.

The Project Steering Committee recently adopted a purpose and need statement and a set of goals and objectives. These documents will guide the development of alternatives in the study. The adopted purpose and need statement and goals and objectives are posted on the project web site at www.i5to99w.org.

Though the project alternatives have not yet been defined, they are likely to include options that range from only improvements to existing streets and demand management solutions to options that look at new roadway connections. The project team will develop evaluation criteria, analyze future transportation needs and study the community and environmental features in the study area. The project will host an open house early next fall to begin identifying potential transportation corridors.

The project team will meet with community groups this spring and summer to share information about the project?s progress. Call 503.595.9915 or send email to info@i5to99w.org to request a speaker for your group.