Author Archive | lpeterson

The Sunrise Corridor

In the 1980s, ODOT created a new list of highways that would be built to improve access statewide – Access Oregon Highways. One of these highways was to connect the Portland region to eastern Oregon via Mt. Hood: Sunrise Highway from I-205 to Hwy 26 via Damascus/Boring. This roadway is in the beginning phases of being planned. The first segment to be discussed is a northern bypass of the Clackamas Industrial Area from I-205 to Rock Creek where highways 212 and 224 split.

There are several users of this proposed roadway that are discussed: truck traffic from the industrial area, Mt. Hood recreational travelers as well as existing and future Damascus residents.

In the 1980s, ODOT created a new list of highways that would be built to improve access statewide – Access Oregon Highways. One of these highways was to connect the Portland region to eastern Oregon via Mt. Hood: Sunrise Highway from I-205 to Hwy 26 via Damascus/Boring. This roadway is in the beginning phases of being planned. The first segment to be discussed is a northern bypass of the Clackamas Industrial Area from I-205 to Rock Creek where highways 212 and 224 split.

There are several users of this proposed roadway that are discussed: truck traffic from the industrial area, Mt. Hood recreational travelers as well as existing and future Damascus residents.

Clackamas County has been working with consultants, David Evans and Associate, and a Policy Advisory Committee (members from ODOT, Metro, Industrial land owners and Damascus city council) for the last year to update the Draft Environmental Impact Statement from 1998. Currently, alternatives being discussed for the first phase of the Sunrise Corridor can be viewed on the website http://www.deainc.com/sunrise/index.html. Currently, there are interchange alternatives under discussion and a proposed 6-lane bypass of the current Hwy 212/224 to the north. There are still many opportunities to get involved in this process.

The County will be making a final recommendation on alternatives in the next couple of months but the public process outlined on the website has not been updated to indicate a specific timeline.

Some of the issues outlined below are summarized from other comments made during the process.

  • Gateway Feature – Project should be an entry for visitors and commuters to Mt. Hood and Damascus.
  • Sustainable Design Principles – minimize noise created by tires and engines, water runoff and the footprint of the project on the landscape. Maximize greenery with low maintenance landscaping including trees. And minimize the impact to Rock Creek with placement of the interchange for Damascus.
  • Design this segment to compliment the Damascus Parkway Idea
  • Cost Effective – Analyze whether the purchase of ROW for 6-lanes but only build 4-lanes in first stage is more cost-effective.
  • Improve freight access by solving existing congestion issues on Hwy 212/224/I-205 interchange.
  • Minimize impacts to existing businesses – Oregon Iron Works (will be manufacturing Portland Streetcars) and others have the potential to expand and should not be forced out by this project.
  • Minimize impacts to Milwaukie and Damascus – a new 6-lane highway feeding into a 4-lane to the west and a 2-lane to the east may have serious livability issues.
  • Consider analyzing a NEW Alternative with a Lower Design Speed – assume a 45-50 mph design speed and compare it against other alternatives in cost and mobility measures.
  • Model alternative ideas for ALL the interchanges using a combination of modern roundabouts, rotaries and ramps to reduce the number of flyovers. And reduced design speeds. Then compare these ideas against other alternatives in cost and mobility measures.
  • Include the Damascus Concept Plan road network for the next round of modeling to better predict demand on Sunrise Project.
  • Do NOT use the 2030 land use forecasts unless they are recommended by MPAC and adopted by Metro Council