Archive | June, 2006

Happy Birthday to … Us!

Yes, today is the anniversary of the first post here on Portland Transport. While we didn’t go public until the following week, it was a year ago that we first cajoled friends and family to take a peek at this thing we had created – and please leave some comments so visitors would see some activity when the press release went out!

One year later we’ve posted some impressive numbers (as of the time I’m drafting this):

– 581 posts
– 3950 comments
– 66,000+ visitors

Yes, today is the anniversary of the first post here on Portland Transport. While we didn’t go public until the following week, it was a year ago that we first cajoled friends and family to take a peek at this thing we had created – and please leave some comments so visitors would see some activity when the press release went out!

One year later we’ve posted some impressive numbers (as of the time I’m drafting this):

– 581 posts
– 3950 comments
– 66,000+ visitors

Happy birthday to all our contributors, commenters, and especially the readers, about 400 per day right now.

Many happy returns!

[photo credit to iam4ranny under Creative Commons license]

Happy Birthday to the Interstate Highway System

As an article in last week’s Economist (sorry, you probably have to jump through some registration screens to see this) reminds us, it was 50 years ago this month that President Eisenhower signed the bill creating the Interstate Highway System (hanging a carrot of 90% Federal matching funds in front of states).

The impact on our landscape, cities and economy has been tremendous, in both positive and negative ways. The key question is what is the direction for the next 50 years?

Shades for a Planet

Add a new word to your lexicon: geoengineering – the idea of deliberately altering the earth’s natural systems (as opposed to the unintended altering humanity has always done).

Today’s New York Times features an article (How to Cool a Planet, Maybe) on the idea of massive programs to alter the reflectivity of the atmosphere and the oceans as a counter to the global warming effect of greenhouse gases.

Let’s not give up on conservation just yet.

On the other side of the equation, the Supreme Court has just agreed to take up the question of whether the Federal Government should regulate carbon dioxide (greenhouse gas # 1) under the Clean Air Act.